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Annie's House

Annie’s House Adaptive Recreation Program at Bottineau Winter Park provides services year-round to individuals and veterans with intellectual and physical disabilities. We offer programing that allows individuals with disabilities to enjoy the same activities as nondisabled individuals. We offer adaptive equipment, trained instructors in a nonjudgmental friendly and fun environment. Scholarships are available for qualifying individuals. For more information call 701-263-4556 and ask for Rachael Buss.

Winter: We offer our adaptive ski program which makes it possible for anyone with a disability to experience the excitement of Alpine (downhill) skiing. Our instructors will evaluate strengths and provide the best equipment for the individual to be successful. We have expanded our adaptive program to offer adaptive snowboard lessons. We also offer ice fishing, snowshoeing, and have two action trac chairs available allowing those in wheelchairs or other physical disabilities more independence when participating in outdoor activities at Annie’s House.

Spring Summer and Fall: For our snowless months of the year, we offer fishing, canoeing, paddleboats, hiking, biking and horseback riding. The program provided the equipment and the instructors to make these activities as successful as our winter programs.

Adventures 4 Vets Program provided veterans with a 10% or higher disability rating for a service related disability to participate in adventures for little or no cost through a grant from the Veterans Administration. Veterans should call for program details.

For more information or to schedule an activity at Annie’s House call or email: rachael.buss@annecenter.org – 701-263-4556 and ask for Rachael Buss 

 

 

History

Ann Nicole Nelson, of Stanley, died on Sept. 11, 2001, in Tower One of the World Trade Center, where she was working on the 104th floor. Her bucket list was published on her birthday, May 17, 2006, in the New York Times. 

Gary Nelson said after his daughter’s list was published, he and his wife, Jenette, were contacted by the New York Says Thank You Foundation, which wanted to “pay it forward” in some way in North Dakota.

Several years later, the idea for Annie’s House became a reality. A groundbreaking in 2012 fell on what would have been Ann’s 41st birthday.

A large construction party was held in September with 20 firefighters who survived the 9/11 attacks, along with ground zero construction workers and their families. They came to Bottineau to work alongside local volunteers in putting up Annie’s House, the area’s first adaptive sports center for people with physical and cognitive disabilities. It will also be for Veterans - the program is called Adventure 4 Vets.

 

The interior of Annie’s House has 12,000 square feet of space with large windows in a commons area, allowing a panoramic view of the ski area’s slopes. The beams in the main common area are painted with Ann's bucket list, embedding her spirit into the very foundation of the buliding. In an alcove, the ceilings are adorned with the locations of all of the far flung volunteers.

 

Annie's House is special, and I encourage a visit to experience the adaptive program or the Bottineau Winter Park (which is housed in the same building).

 

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